Excitement abounds – salmon season opens Saturday

Garberville resident Broc Contreras landed a nice salmon this week while fishing out of Shelter Cove. The ocean sport salmon season from Shelter Cove north to the CA/OR border will open on Saturday and run through Aug. 9. Photo courtesy of Jake Mitchell/Sea Hawk Sport Fishing

The crown jewel of our ocean fishing season will kick off on Saturday, and it couldn’t come at a better time. To say we could use a break or a distraction from what’s happening in the world would be an understatement. Though the effects of the on-going pandemic and protesting will likely take a little luster off the opener, there will be plenty of full boats loaded with smiling anglers headed out come Saturday morning. What will they find? No one knows for sure, but I like what I’m hearing from our surrounding ports. The bite out of Shelter Cove picked up this week, and the grade of fish was excellent. Though not open until Saturday, there’s been quite a few salmon caught incidentally in Crescent City by boats targeting rockfish and anglers fishing close to the beach for CA halibut. In the Eureka area, the nearshore water temperatures have cooled to a salmon-friendly 52-53 degrees, and there appears to be plenty of birds and bait. All signs are pointing towards a very good opener, and boy can we use it.

Weekend Marine Forecast
If the forecast holds, salmon anglers should get in a decent weekend of fishing. Saturday’s forecast is calling for winds out of the W 5 to 10 knots and waves W 5 feet at 10 seconds. The forecast is a little rougher on Sunday, with winds coming out of the NW 5 to 10 knots and W waves 7 feet at 10 seconds. A chance of showers is in the forecast for Saturday. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www.weather.gov/eureka/ or https://www.windy.com. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the National Weather Service at (707) 443-7062 or the office on Woodley Island at (707) 443-6484.

Use extreme caution when crossing Humboldt Bar
There could be potential early morning hazardous bar conditions beginning on Saturday due to the combination of tides and swells converging at the time when boats could be headed out the entrance. For the salmon opener on Saturday, 8 feet. of water will be flowing out down to a -2.0 feet at 7:03 a.m. You should always error on the side of caution — even if it means waiting until the out-flowing water from the bay has slowed, which usually occurs within 30 to 45 minutes prior to the tide bottoming out. Recreational anglers can provide bar reports on VHF channel 68 while the Coast Guard emergency channel is 16 on the VHF. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan. The bar cam, located at http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/barCam/?cam=humboldtBayBar, remains off line.

Weekend tides
The tidal exchanges will be big this weekend, with minus tides in the morning making for a potentially dangerous bar crossing.

Saturday June 6: High: 12:02 a.m. (8.0) and Low: 7:03 a.m. (-2.0 ft.), High 1:51 p.m. (5.6 ft.) and Low 6:44 p.m. (2.6 ft.)

Sunday June 7: High: 12:46 a.m. (7.8) and Low: 7:49 a.m. (-1.9 ft.), High 2:43 p.m. (5.6 ft.) and Low 7:34 p.m. (2.8 ft.)

General sport salmon regulations:
Our 2020 ocean sport salmon season runs from June 6 through August 9 and is open from the OR/CA border south to Horse Mountain, (Klamath Management Zone). Fishing is allowed seven days per week for all salmon except Coho, two fish per day and a minimum size limit of 20 inches total length for Chinook. The possession is no more than two daily bag limits in possession while on land. On a vessel in ocean waters, no person shall possess or bring ashore more than one daily bag limit. No salmon punch card is required for ocean salmon fishing. For complete ocean salmon regulations, please visit the Ocean Salmon webpage at https://wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Regulations/Salmon#recreational or call the Ocean Salmon Regulations Hotline (707) 576-3429.

Big Salmon Contest
Eureka’s Englund Marine will be holding its BIG FISH Salmon Contest again this year. The annual event runs from June 6 to August 9. There is no entry fee and you can enter as many fish as you’d like. Salmon need to be gutted and gilled. Prizes will be awarded to the top three fish. A complete list of rules and regulations are available at Englund Marine, 2 Commercial St., Eureka, 707-444-9266.

RMI Outdoors fishing contest
RMI Outdoors of Eureka will be holding their second Screamin’ Reels fishing contest beginning on June 6 and running through Aug. 9. There are three categories: ocean salmon, Pacific halibut, and California halibut. You can enter up to six fish per day: two ocean salmon, three CA halibut, and one Pacific halibut per day. An RMI Outdoors associate will weigh your catch, fill out an entry form, and take your picture for the brag wall. All salmon must be gutted and gilled; anglers must have a valid 2020 fishing license; Fish and Wildlife regulations apply. Each angler that brings in a fish has a chance to win a $100 RMI Gift Card. Visit https://www.facebook.com/RMIOutdoors

Fish for free this weekend in Oregon
Oregon will be having a Free Fishing Weekend on June 6 and 7. On those two days, no license, tag or endorsement is required to fish, crab or clam anywhere in Oregon. This applies only to waters already open to fishing, crabbing or clamming. All other regulations, such as bag limits, still apply. Visit https://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2020/06_June/060320b.asp for more info.

The Oceans:
Eureka
“The Eureka fleet hasn’t been offshore since last Thursday,” said Skipper Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing. “The wind has been blowing and it’s just been too rough. When we did get out, the halibut bit pretty well. There were some limits caught on the 48-line in 300 feet of water. Most of the fish were on the small side. Looking ahead to salmon, it looks like the wind will die down for the opener on Saturday. The last time we were on the water, the salmon signs looked pretty good. There were lots of birds from the entrance to the whistle buoy and lots of bait in 40-50 fathoms.”

Trinidad
The Pacific halibut fishing has been really good this week reports Curt Wilson of Wind Rose Charters. He said, “We’ve been able to get limits every day, but most of the fish have been on the small side. We’ve been fishing a mile north in 240 feet of water. The rockfish bite has been good as well, but the lingcod have been a little tougher to come by. The salmon opener is looking promising. Out in 240 feet of water there’s been lots of life. Birds, bait, whales and we’ve seen a few salmon on the surface. That’s probably where we’ll start on Saturday,” added Wilson.

Shelter Cove
Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing reports there’s been a pretty decent salmon bite around the whistle the last few days. “The water temps are about perfect, and more bait is starting to show up,” said Mitchell. We’ve been getting them mooching, but the trollers are doing well too. The fish have been a really good grade so far. The rockfish bite has been good around the Hat this week as well with the exception of lingcod, which have been a little tougher to come by lately. Looks like wind is going to blow for a few days.”

Crescent City
“All signs are pointing to a good salmon opener,” said Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine. “The water temps are good, and there’s lots of birds and bait. And quite a few salmon have been seen finning on the surface. The salmon seem to be in close too, with good signs around Round Rock. The rockfish bite has picked up as well, with boats getting easy limits of lings as well. Just a few California halibut have been caught, but that should get going soon,” Carson added.

Brookings
Windy weather has limited ocean fishing to the early morning, but it isn’t taking anglers long to limit on rockfish and get a few lingcod reports Andy Martin, of Brookings Fishing Charters. “Bottom fishing has been very good close to the harbor,” said Martin. “Ocean salmon season doesn’t open until June 20. The surfperch action is at its peak right now as the fish have just begun spawning at Brookings-area beaches.”

Lower Rogue
Salmon fishing remains slow on the lower Rogue, mainly because of the amount of moss in the river according to Martin. “Baits must be continually reeled in and cleaned, limiting their effectiveness. Wild kings may now be kept on the Rogue. The bay has yet to produce any salmon,” said Martin.

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

2020 California Recreational Ocean Salmon Regulations

Photo courtesy of Tony Sepulveda/Green Water Fishing Adventures

OR/CA Border to Horse Mountain (KMZ)

June 6 – August 9

  • Open seven days per week
  • Minimum size limit: 20 inches total length
  • Klamath Control Zone* (KCZ) closed in August
  • Additional closures around mouth of Klamath, Smith & Eel rivers

Horse Mountain to Point Arena (Shelter Cove and Fort Bragg)

May 1 – November 8

  • Open seven days per week
  • Minimum size limit: 20 inches total length

Point Arena to Pigeon Point (San Francisco)

May 1 – November 8

  • Open seven days per week
  • Minimum size limit: 20 inches total length

Pigeon Point to U.S./Mexico Border (Monterey and South)

May 1 – October 4

  • Open seven days per week
  • Minimum size limit: 24 inches total length

General Sport Regulations

  • Daily bag limit: 2 salmon of any species except Coho.
  • Possession limit: No more than two daily bag limits may be possessed when on land. On a vessel in ocean waters, no person shall possess or bring ashore more than one daily bag limit.
  • 2020 Sport Ocean Salmon Season Flyer (PDF)

*Klamath Control Zone: The ocean area at the Klamath River mouth bounded on the north by 41°38’48” N. lat. (approximately 6 nautical miles north of the Klamath River mouth); on the west, by 124°23’00” W. long. (approximately 12 nautical miles off shore); and on the south, by 41°26’48” N. lat. (approximately 6 nautical miles south of the Klamath River mouth).

2020 Oregon Recreational Ocean Salmon Regulations

Humbug Mountain to OR/CA Border

(OR KMZ – Brookings Area)

June 20 – August 7

  • Open seven days per week
  • Minimum size limit: 24 inches total length

Offshore angling hampered by wind

It was a very quiet holiday weekend, especially for the boats that wanted to head offshore. The north wind was prevalent out of Eureka all weekend, never letting up enough to allow boats to venture outside Humboldt Bay. But, judging by the number of boats, kayaks, and even bank anglers fishing in the bay, there was clearly a pretty good alternative. California halibut was the main focus for anglers, and the fishing was either good or bad – depending on who you talked to. Scores ranged from limits to skunks, and everything in between. Halibut are currently scattered from North bay all the way down to the Coast Guard Station. The Fairhaven area was the scene of some pretty good fishing the last few days by both bank anglers and boats. The mouth of Elk River also produced some decent action. Live bait always seems to produce more fish, but plenty were caught this weekend drifting and trolling dead anchovies. Swimbaits also caught their share of fish. This fishery will only get better as we move through the summer. Halibut should continue to move into the bay in bigger numbers, and they should continue to get bigger as well. The limit is three and the minimum size is twenty-two inches total length.

Weekend marine forecast
Strong north winds and steep seas will continue through Friday, but it looks like seas will settle down over the weekend. On Friday, W winds will be 5 to 15 knots with N waves 8 feet at 8 seconds and W 7 feet at 14 seconds. Saturday’s forecast is calling for W winds 5 to 10 knots with NW swells 6 feet at 11 seconds. Sunday’s prediction is for N winds 5 to 15 knots with NW swells 6 feet at 9 seconds. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www.weather.gov/eureka/ or https://www.windy.com. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the National Weather Service at (707) 443-7062 or the office on Woodley Island at (707) 443-6484.

Big Halibut Contest
Eureka’s Englund Marine is once again holding their BIG FISH Halibut Contest. The annual event started May 1 and will run through October 31, 2020, or until the quota is reached. There is no entry fee and you can enter as many fish as you’d like. Fish do not need to be gutted and gilled. Prizes will be awarded to the top three fish. A complete list of rules and regulations are available at Englund Marine, 2 Commercial St., Eureka, 707-444-9266.

The Oceans:
Eureka
Ocean conditions were terrible over the weekend reports Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing. “We haven’t been out in a couple weeks, and conditions don’t look great heading into the weekend. Thursday is looking like the best day.”

Shelter Cove
Like the rest of the North Coast, Shelter Cove didn’t have much action over the weekend due to the wind according to Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing. He said, “It was very windy and hardly anyone was out. I think only two boats made it out for a while, and I heard they caught one salmon. Looks like we should be getting a little break from the wind this weekend.”

Crescent City
“When the boats have been able to get out, the rockfish bite has been excellent,” said Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine. “The weather wasn’t great over the weekend, but boats that went out came back with limits. There were also a couple Pacific halibut caught at South Reef using B2 squid. The California halibut are starting to trickle in, I heard a few were caught this weekend. The big news is there were several salmon caught and released recently. They were in close and some were caught off the lighthouse jetty. This is encouraging with our salmon season opener right around the corner,” Carson added.

Jake Schwab of Logan, Utah, holds a black and canary rockfish caught May 24 with Brookings Fishing Charters. Photo courtesy of Brookings Fishing Charters

Brookings
Lingcod and rockfish action remains very good out of Brooking reports Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “Pacific halibut are being caught on calm days when boats can get offshore. Fishing is still slow for California halibut. Ocean salmon season opens June 20 out of Brookings,” added Martin.

Lower Rogue
According to Martin, spring salmon fishing improved a little on the lower Rogue last week, as more hatchery fish arrived. “Fishing remains slow, but anglers putting in their time are finding an occasional springer in the Elephant Rock area.”

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

Fall salmon quotas set for Klamath and Trinity rivers

The California Fish and Game Commission adopted the Klamath River basin fall-run adult salmon quota, which will begin on Aug. 15 on the Klamath and Aug. 31 on the Trinity. The basin-wide quota in 2020 is set at 1,296 adult salmon, which is much smaller than last year’s quota of 7,637. Photo courtesy of Mike Coopman’s Guide Service

Following last year’s low returns and with only 186,600 adult Klamath kings said to be in the ocean this fall, anglers are facing a much lower sport quota in 2020. During last Thursday’s meeting, the California Fish and Game Commission adopted bag and possession limits for the Klamath Basin based on a quota of 1,296 fall-run adults. The Commission also adopted a size change for jacks (grilse), or two-year-old salmon within the Klamath River basin. The size used to delineate adult fall Chinook salmon, currently set at greater than 22 inches total length, has been changed to greater than 23 inches total length. In the past, the Department has used a provisional standard of 55 centimeters fork length to estimate the jack harvest of KRFC during the season. This equates to 21.7 inches when converted to fork length, and 23.2 inches when converted to total length. The new jack size will now be consistent between what’s used for recreational harvest and what’s used for research and monitoring.

On the Klamath, the fall season begins on Aug. 15 and closes Dec. 31. The daily bag limit will be two Chinook salmon, no more than one of which may be greater than 23 inches, and a possession limit of six, of which only three may be greater than 23 inches. On the Lower Klamath, from the Highway 96 bridge at Weitchpec to the mouth, 648 adults will be allowed for sport harvest. The section above the 96 bridge at Weitchpec to 3,500 feet downstream of the Iron Gate Dam will get 220 adults. The take of salmon is prohibited from Iron Gate Dam downstream to Weitchpec from Jan. 1 through Aug. 14.

The Spit Area (within 100 yards of the channel through the sand spit formed at the Klamath River mouth) will close when 15 percent of the total Klamath River Basin quota is taken downstream of the Highway 101 bridge. In 2020, 194 adults can be harvested below the 101 bridge before the closure at the mouth is implemented. The rest of the area below Highway 101 (estuary) will remain open to recreational fishing.

On the Trinity, where the fall season begins Sept. 1 and closes Dec. 31., the quota is set at 428 adults. The quota will be split evenly; 214 adults for the main stem Trinity downstream of the Old Lewiston Bridge to the Highway 299 West bridge at Cedar Flat and 214 adults for the main stem Trinity downstream of the Denny Road bridge at Hawkins Bar to the confluence with the Klamath. The main stem downstream of the Highway 299 Bridge at Cedar Flat to the Denny Road Bridge in Hawkins Bar is closed to all fishing September 1 through December 31. The take of salmon is prohibited from the confluence of the South Fork Trinity River downstream to the confluence of the Klamath River from Jan. 1 through Aug. 31.

Once these quotas have been met, no Chinook salmon greater than 23 inches in length may be retained. Anglers may still retain a limit of Chinook salmon under 23 inches in length.

Important Reminder
: Spring-run Chinook salmon fishing regulations will run from July 1 through Aug. 14 on the Klamath and through Aug. 31 on the Trinity. The bag limit is one salmon per day, with two in possession.

Additional season information can be found on CDFW’s ocean salmon webpage or by calling CDFW’s ocean salmon hotline at (707) 576-3429 or the Klamath-Trinity River hotline at (800) 564-6479. All anglers on the Trinity and Klamath rivers must have Salmon Harvest Cards in their possession when fishing for salmon.

Weekend Marine Forecast
The marine forecast for the holiday weekend is looking extremely blustery. On Saturday, winds will be out of the N blowing 10 to 20 knots and waves N 8 feet at 7 seconds. The wind will start to come down slightly on Sunday, coming out of the N at 10 to 15 knots with N waves 6 feet at 7 seconds and NW 5 feet at 14 seconds. On Monday, winds will be out of the N 10 to 15 knots with N waves 7 feet at 7 seconds and W 5 feet at 13 seconds. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www.weather.gov/eureka/ or https://www.windy.com. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the National Weather Service at (707) 443-7062 or the office on Woodley Island at (707) 443-6484.

HASA hosting “Big Fish” contests
Humboldt Area Saltwater Anglers is currently hosting two big fish contests, the “Biggest Lingcod” and the “Biggest Pacific Halibut. Both began on May 15, 2020 and will end June 15, 2020. Winners will be announced the following day with verifiable entry. Entries into each contest are $10 and can be purchased online at https://humboldtasa.com/the-biggest-fish-contests/. Contestants must submit two pictures, one of your fish being measured with a closed mouth from the tip of its nose to middle of tail down the lateral line of the fish. The second being a picture of you with the fish. Submit entry by posting pictures to HASA Facebook page or email to hasa6191@gmail.com to be entered. Please include name and where you are from, type of fish with length and weight if possible, and location caught (not limited to Humboldt County but still limited to California).

First Place winners of each contest will receive a $150 prepaid Coast Central Credit Union Mastercard. Additionally, a randomly drawn contestant from each contest will receive $50 prepaid CCCU Mastercard. Winners will be announced on our website, Facebook Page and http://humboldttuna.com/ on June 17. Other Big Fish Contests scheduled throughout the summer include: black snapper, salmon, California halibut, albacore, and exotic fish. For more information along with rules and regulations, visit https://humboldtasa.com/2020/05/15/open-season-on-pacific-halibut-ling-cog-biggest-fish-contest/

The Oceans:

Eureka
“Most of the boats have been tied up since last week, and it looks like more marginal weather is on the way,” said Skipper Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing. “Friday was the last really good day weather-wise. Quite a few boats went south for rockfish and plenty went straight out targeting halibut. And plenty of fish were caught in both locations. The rockfish bite wasn’t wide-open for us at the Cape as we had to move around a little. The lingcod however, bit really well and the limits came easy. I heard there were quite a few halibut caught and some boats were able to boat limits. It sounded like some of the best fishing was between the 46 and 48-lines,” said Klassen.

Shelter Cove
According to Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing, ocean conditions haven’t been very good since last week. He said, “It’s been pretty lousy for the most part and hardly anyone has been out. Last Friday was really the only decent day and quite a few boats were on the water. We got our limits of rockfish and lingcod at the Hat and then came back up to the whistle to finish the day trolling for salmon. We ended up putting five in the box. We snuck out on Tuesday and got a half-day of rock fishing in. We boated limits of lingcod and just short of limits on snappers off the Ranch House. I did hear that a few salmon were caught on Tuesday at the whistle, but for the most part, it’s been spotty. The wind is predicted to blow through Memorial Day.”

Crescent City
Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine reports the rockfish and lingcod action are kicking into high gear. “Conditions haven’t been great this week, but a few boats have been out almost every day,” said Carson. “The lingcod bite has really turned on, and most guys are getting limits along with their rockfish. Boats are getting fish at all the usual spots, including the Sisters and both reefs. A couple Pacific halibut have also been caught this week. Both came out near the South Reef in 250 feet of water,” Carson added.

Brookings
Bottom fishing has been good, weather permitting, out of Brookings according to Andy Martin, of Brookings Fishing Charters. “The bar at the mouth of the Rogue in Gold Beach has been very rough,” added Martin.

River openings
Sections of the main Eel (South Fork to Cape Horn Dam), South Fork Eel (South Fork Eel River from mouth to Rattlesnake Creek) Van Duzen, Mad, Little River, Mattole and Smith will re-open on Saturday, May 23rd. On most rivers, only artificial lures with barbless hooks may be used. For a complete list of river openings and regulations visit https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=177572&inline

Lower Rogue
“Rain over the weekend seemed to draw some fresh springers into the lower Rogue, with perhaps the best fishing so far this season,” said Martin. “Catch rates are still poor, but many guides anchoring all day are averaging a fish or two. Wild springers still must be released through the end of the month.”

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

Offshore conditions look good for Friday

The weekend doesn’t look as promising

Twin brothers Connor, left, and Logan Petrusha of Eureka landed a nice twin pair of Pacific halibut while fishing out of Eureka on Sunday. The boys were fishing with their father Chuck along the 48-line in 300 feet of water. Photo courtesy of Chuck Petrusha

If you’ve been waiting to feel the tug of a big ole’ halibut or a feisty lingcod, Friday looks to be the day. As of Wednesday, the forecast was calling for winds up to 5 knots and waves 5 feet at 12 seconds. Those are ideal for both halibut and rockfish, as well as salmon in Shelter Cove. Ocean conditions haven’t been great this week, but we did hear some encouraging reports from the weekend. According to Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing, quite a few Pacific halibut were caught. “It was a pretty good start to the season,” said Klassen. “We boated limits on Saturday and I heard the fishing was better on Sunday. Most of the boats were right around 48-line in 250 to 300 feet of water.” The rockfish bite at the Cape remains excellent as well. Plenty of boats took advantage of the weather and made the run on Sunday, including Klassen. “The rockfish bite was fast and furious, and they’re really a good grade too. The lingcod didn’t bite as well, but we managed half limits with fish to 20-pounds.” A good way to kick off the saltwater season indeed.

Important reminder:
When fishing for halibut, rockfish and salmon (Shelter Cove), or any combination of the three, the more restrictive gear and depth restrictions apply. When targeting salmon, or once salmon are aboard and in possession, anglers are limited to using barbless hooks (barbless circle hooks if fishing south of Horse Mountain) when fishing for other species.

When targeting rockfish, cabezon, greenling and lingcod, or once any of these species are aboard and in possession, anglers are limited to fishing in waters shallower than 180 feet when fishing for other species.

Weekend marine forecast
For coastal waters from Pt. St. George to Cape Mendocino out 10 nautical miles, Friday looks like your best day to get offshore. The forecast is calling for NW winds to 5 knots with waves out of the W 5 feet at 12 seconds. On Saturday, winds will be out of the S 10 to 15 knots with W waves 8 feet at 12 seconds and W 4 feet at 18 seconds. The south wind is predicted to blow up to 15 knots on Sunday, with W waves 6 feet at 6 seconds and W 8 feet at 14 seconds. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www.weather.gov/eureka/ or https://www.windy.com. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the National Weather Service at (707) 443-7062 or the office on Woodley Island at (707) 443-6484.

California halibut in Humboldt Bay
The California halibut bite continues to be hit and miss in the bay. There were lots of boats trying over the weekend, and a few limits were reportedly caught. The freshwater coming into the bay shouldn’t keep the halibut from moving in, but it could slow the bite.

The Beach/Jetty’s
The Redtail perch bite along the beaches continues to be red hot. There are some spots that are typically better than others, but you can catch them just about anywhere this time of the year. Some of the better locations recently have been Table Bluff and Centerville. Conditions look good for Friday, with swells in the 4 to 5-foot range. Both the north and south jetty’s have been fishing well for the past few weeks. Five to six-inch Gulp jerk shads are a popular bait as well as smaller swimbaits. Egg sinkers or banana weights rigged with a herring or anchovies are also catching rockfish and lingcod.

Brookings
“Bottom fishing has been good out of Brookings on the calmer days,” said Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “Halibut are being caught in 180 feet of water off of Bird Island. Surfperch fishing is at its peak.”

Crescent City
Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine reports the rockfish bite was good over the weekend. “I heard quite a few limits were caught, with most of the boats fishing near the reefs. The lingcod bite hasn’t been as good. Most of the lings are being caught closer to shore due to them spawning. We haven’t seen much success on the Pacific halibut yet, I’ve heard of one caught so far. Same goes for the California halibut, though not many have been trying. The conditions were pretty bad this week, but Friday and Saturday are looking better,” Carson added.

Shelter Cove
“We had a decent salmon bite on Friday, but it shut down before the weekend,” said Captain Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing. “I only heard of a handful caught on Saturday and Sunday. The salmon bite was mostly around the whistle. There hasn’t been as much effort towards rockfish, but I did hear some good reports from some guys who fished around the Old Man. The boat pressure has been fairly light. Our busiest day was Friday when we launched 15. This Friday and Saturday look fishable, but it looks like it might blow back out by Sunday.”

Lower Rogue River
Spring salmon fishing remains slow on the Rogue River, but fish are expected to move in with the latest series of storms according to Martin. “So far, the run has been disappointing, but the river has been low and clear for much of the spring,” added Martin.

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

Saltwater season off to a slow start

Beth Hendry of McKinleyville landed a nice California halibut last Sunday while fishing in Humboldt Bay. The California halibut bite is picking up in the bay, with peak season usually being towards the end of May through July. Photo courtesy of Ben Herring

Whether it’s lack of effort, lack of reports, the weather, or dealing with COVID-19 – the saltwater season came out of the gates a little slower than usual. Fish were caught, but things just felt a little off. Maybe it’s because the charter boats aren’t taking customers as of yet? As the weather improves, and the county begins to relax some of the shelter in place guidelines, let’s hope we can get back to some sort of normalcy. Until then, we do have plenty of options. A few boats on Friday ran south to Cape Mendocino for rockfish. According to Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing, the fishing was very “Cape-like”, with full limits of rockfish and lingcod for all. “A few boats also ran straight out for Pacific halibut over the weekend,” said Klassen. “The weather wasn’t great on Friday, but has been a little better since. I did hear of a couple being caught, but there hasn’t been much effort yet.

Beth Hendry of McKinleyville with a couple nice California halibut. Photo courtesy of Ben Herring

There’s also been quite a few California halibut caught in the bay. It’s not wide-open, but it does look like we’ll have a good season again this year.” The one bit of concerning news is the water temps out front of Eureka. According to Klassen, they’re currently in the 55-degree range, which is a little warmer than what we’d like to see. “We haven’t had any sustained north winds as of yet. Hopefully by the time salmon season opens up the water will have cooled down.”

Pacific halibut season length set
The fishing season along the California coast will be open May 1 through October 31, or until the subarea quota is estimated to have been taken and the season is closed by the International Pacific Halibut Commission, whichever is earlier. In 2020, the quota is 39,000 pounds.

Important reminder:
When fishing for halibut and rockfish, the more restrictive gear and depth restrictions apply. When targeting rockfish, cabezon, greenling and lingcod, or once any of these species are aboard and in possession, anglers are limited to fishing in waters shallower than 180 feet when fishing for other species. If you’re targeting both halibut and rockfish, you’ll want to get your halibut first.

Weekend marine forecast
For coastal waters from Pt. St. George to Cape Mendocino out 10 nautical miles, the marine forecast is looking good for the weekend, especially on Sunday. Saturday’s forecast is calling for NW winds 5 to 10 knots with waves out of the NW 4 feet at 6 seconds and W 6 feet at 12 seconds. On Sunday, winds will be out of the SW 5 to 10 knots with W waves 4 feet at 11 seconds. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www.weather.gov/eureka/ or https://www.windy.com. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the National Weather Service at (707) 443-7062 or the office on Woodley Island at (707) 443-6484.

Shelter Cove
“Salmon fishing has been pretty slow, but there are some around and the grade is pretty decent,” said Captain Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing. “Boats have been averaging 0-1 fish per rod since the opener. I’ve heard of more fish in the 20 pound-class class this year already than I did all of last year. There hasn’t been much bait around and the fish seem to be pretty spread out. Since the opener, when we launched over 30 boats, we’ve been launching about 15 per day. Most of the effort has been towards salmon. The rockfish bite has been really good, with most of the action around Rodgers Break. We fished that area on Tuesday and after getting all of our rockfish, we ran in to a fair amount of bait in the canyon. We trolled for four hours and went 2-4 on salmon.  The majority of the salmon caught over the last few days have been outside the whistle in 25 fathoms.”

Steve Mitchell with a nice Shelter Cove king from Tuesday while fishing with son, Captain Jake Mitchell. Photo courtesy of Jake Mitchell

Brookings
Ocean fishing continues to be good out of Brookings, with a few halibut caught on the May 1 opener and limits of rockfish for most boats reports Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “Surfperch also are biting well at most beaches anglers are able to access. Good weather is expected this weekend.”

Crescent City
Chris Hegnes of Crescent City’s Englund Marine reports the rockfish bite was good on the opener, with about 30 boats out. “Since then, the ocean hasn’t been very cooperative. I haven’t heard of anyone trying for halibut yet as it’s been too rough. There have been quite a few lingcod caught off the jetty’s recently,” Hegnes added.

Fish and Game Commission meeting on May 14
The California Fish and Game Commission will meet on Thursday, May 14 in Sacramento at 10 a.m. via webinar and teleconference to adopt and discuss changes to the upcoming Klamath River sport fishing season. The PFMC recommended 1,296 adult salmon be allocated for recreational fishing for the Klamath and Trinity Rivers. The tribal allocation is 8,632, split between the Yurok and Hoopa tribes. The Commission will make final decisions on bag and possession limits. At the previous Commission meeting, the CDFW suggested a two-fish bag limit, with no more than one adult. The recommendation for possession limit was 6 salmon, no more than 3 adults. A couple other Department proposals are also on the agenda. One, the proposal to make the jack (grilse) salmon size limit cutoff range of less than or equal to 22 inches to 23 inches total length for discussion before the Department makes a final recommendation. The Department is also proposing to increase the daily bag and possession limit for Brown Trout on the main stem of the Trinity River from a five fish daily bag/10 fish possession limit to a 10 fish daily bag/20 fish possession limit.

Members of the public may participate in the teleconference via Zoom on your computer or mobile app. You can also listen via phone call. The meeting will also be livestreamed at https://fgc.ca.gov/ for listening purposes only. If you’re interested in the Klamath River fall salmon fishery, you’ll want your voice to be heard. Also on the agenda is the adoption of proposed changes to the Central Valley sport fishing salmon regulations. For more information, visit https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=178907&inline

Lower Rogue River
Spring salmon fishing is still slow on the Rogue River, with low, clear water according to Martin. “The rain over the weekend didn’t do much to raise flows. A few springers are being caught above Lobster Creek. Fishing is very slow near Elephant Rock and the Willows. A bigger rain storm is expected early next week,” added Martin.

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

Rockfish, Pacific halibut set to open Friday

On Tuesday, the CDFW announced that the May 1 Pacific halibut, rockfish, and salmon openers would open as planned. The timing couldn’t be better as the entire North Coast could use a nice little distraction about now. As our community starts to get more and more divisive on which businesses can and can’t open and what we as individuals should and shouldn’t do, heading offshore for a day of fishing sounds pretty relaxing. Even if it means abiding by all state and local health guidelines regarding non-essential travel and physical distancing.

While the Pacific halibut season will open on May 1, CDFW has yet to set a closing date. We do know that this year’s quota will be the same as in 2019, 39,000 pounds. The limit remains at one, with no size restrictions. When angling, no more than one line with two hooks attached may be used. A harpoon, gaff, or net may be used to assist in taking a Pacific halibut that has been legally caught by angling. For more info on Pacific halibut, visit https://wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/marine/pacific-halibut.

The boat-based rockfish season in the Northern Management Area, which runs from the CA/OR border south to near Cape Mendocino, will run through Oct. 31within 180 feet. From Nov. 1 through Dec. 31, rockfish may be taken at any depth. For more info, visit https://wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Regulations/Groundfish-Summary. The recreational salmon fishery will open on May 1 from Horse Mtn., which includes Shelter Cove and Fort Bragg, south to the U.S./Mexico border. The recreational salmon season from Horse Mtn. north to the Oregon border, which includes Humboldt and Del Norte, will open June 6 and run through Aug. 9. For more info, visit https://wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Regulations/Salmon.

As anglers take to the ocean on Friday — weather and conditions permitting – the hope is all the turmoil surrounding the world-wide pandemic will slowly fade into the horizon, leaving only happy thoughts of big lings and barndoor-sized halibut. Even if only for a day.

Shelter Cove salmon outlook
According to Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing, there hasn’t been much salmon sign from what we’ve seen so far out of Shelter Cove. “There’s been a bunch of mackerel around, but they’re in the 2 to 3-pound class and too big for salmon feed,” said Mitchell. “Typically, that’s not a good indicator for salmon. With that said no one has ventured too far to look so well see what happens come Friday.”

Marine forecast
Conditions look decent for Friday’s offshore opener, but the weekend looks a little nasty. Friday’s forecast is calling for S winds 5 to 10 knots with waves out of the W 6 feet at 12 seconds. Saturday’s forecast is calling for S winds 10 to 20 knots with waves out of the W 8 feet at 13 seconds. On Sunday, winds will be out of the NW 5 to 10 knots with W waves 11 feet at 13 seconds. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www.weather.gov/eureka/ or https://www.windy.com. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the National Weather Service at (707) 443-7062 or the office on Woodley Island at (707) 443-6484.

Humboldt County boat ramp status:

Trinidad: According to their website, the Trinidad launch will open on Friday and will launch boats from 7 a.m. until 4 p.m., weather permitting. For more info, call 707-677-3625 or visit http://www.seascape-pier.com/

Shelter Cove: Open from 6:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. Only Humboldt County residents will be allowed to launch, and ID will be required. People must be able to maintain 6 ft. of distance from each other while on the vessel. Only people from the same household/family can be on the vessel together. Cost to launch is $35. For more info, visit https://www.facebook.com/scfpinc/

Friday, May 1 tides – Humboldt Bay
For anglers who aren’t aware, extreme caution should always be used when crossing the bar. The combination of large swells and outgoing morning tides could make for a dangerous bar crossing. On Friday, 6 feet of water will be flowing out down to an -0.1. This could make for a dangerous bar crossing if the swells are large. If you’re planning on hitting the bar at daylight, always check the conditions first. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan.

Friday May 1: Low: 12:45 a.m. (3.4) and High: 6:41a.m. (6.0 ft.), Low 1:37 p.m. (-0.1 ft.) and High 8:54 p.m. (5.6 ft.)

Saturday May 2: Low: 2:05 a.m. (2.8) and High: 8:02 a.m. (5.9 ft.), Low 2:35 p.m. (-0.1 ft.) and High 9:39 p.m. (6.0 ft.)

Sunday May 3: Low: 3:12 a.m. (2.0) and High: 9:17 a.m. (6.0 ft.), Low 3:28 p.m. (-0.0 ft.) and High 10:20 p.m. (6.7 ft.)

USCG Auxiliary boat exams
The Eureka area no longer has a local USCG Auxiliary vessel examiner, but if there’s enough interest, the Crescent City flotilla can send someone down. If interested, email hasa6191@gmail.com. Include your name, phone, address, type of vessel, and if moored in the water or on a trailer.

Kristine Miller of Grants Pass holds a lingcod caught last Saturday aboard the Miss Brooke of Brookings Fishing Charters. The rockfish season in Humboldt and Del Norte counties will open this Friday, May 1. Pacific halibut will also open on Friday in California and north to central Oregon. Photo courtesy of Brookings Fishing Charters

Brookings rockfish update
Lingcod and rockfish have been very good out of Brookings reports Andy Martin, who runs Brookings Fishing Charters. “Pacific halibut season open May 1 and continues through October. Friday’s opener looks good before stormy weather arrives this weekend,” added Martin.

The Rivers:
Main Stem Eel
The main stem Eel is still in fishable shape, but it’s clear. It was flowing at 1,300 cfs on the Scotia gauge as of Wednesday. Fishing reports have been hard to come by.

Smith
The Smith River from its mouth to the confluence of the Middle and South Forks; Middle Fork Smith River from mouth to Patrick Creek; South Fork Smith River from the mouth upstream approximately 1,000 feet to the County Road (George Tryon) bridge and Craigs Creek to Jones Creek, will close after Friday, April 30.

Lower Rogue
According to Martin, spring salmon fishing remains slow on the Rogue River. “Anglers expected more fish with last week’s rain, but fishing is still poor. More rain is expected the beginning of next week.”

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

Sport saltwater season expected to open on time

Four year-old James Coleman of Fortuna landed a black rockfish on a recent trip to the South Jetty with has father, Russell. This was the little anglers first fish landed all by himself. Photo courtesy of Russell Coleman

Next Friday kicks off our ocean sport fishing season on the North Coast as both rockfish and Pacific halibut are set to open on May 1. At least that’s the hope. Our local fishing seasons – and statewide for that matter – are currently littered with unknowns. As of Wednesday, everything I’m reading and hearing are pointing towards the saltwater seasons opening on time. But like everything else at the moment, there’s more questions than answers. Especially when it comes to angling activities where people can congregate – including boats, ramps, and cleaning stations. One of the unknowns is the charter fleet. As of now, there businesses have been deemed nonessential and won’t be allowed to fish groups of anglers due to social distancing. At least that’s what I’ve been told, but this is a very fluid situation. The next question would be how many anglers are allowed on sport boats in order to comply with social distancing? Is there a certain number depending on the size of the boat? Can you only fish with family members who reside in the same household? And what about travel. Can anglers come from out of the county or state to fish here? Again, way more questions than answers. Hopefully, the CDFW will have answers to some of these questions prior to next week’s openers so we’ll all have a clear understanding of the rules.          

May 1 openers:

Pacific Halibut: The 2020 Pacific halibut fishery is slated to open May 1, but the season ending date has yet to be determined. In 2019, the fishery was open May 1 through Oct. 31, seven days a week. Only 17,440 pounds were estimated to have been caught towards the 39,000-pound quota. In 2020, the Pacific halibut allocation for California will be set at 39,000 pounds again. CDFW will monitor catches of Pacific halibut during the season and provide catch projection updates on the CDFW Pacific halibut webpage, https://wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/marine/pacific-halibut#31670772-in-season-tracking. The limit remains at one, with no size restrictions. No more than one line with two hooks attached can be used.

Rockfish: The season for boat-based anglers will run from May 1 through Oct. 31 within 180 feet and Nov. 1 through Dec. 31 with no depth restrictions. The Northern Management Area runs from the CA/OR border to the 40°10′ N. latitude (near Cape Mendocino) and includes most of Humboldt and all of Del Norte County. The Mendocino Management Area runs south of the 40°10′ N. latitude to Point Arena.

Summary of current regulations, Northern Mgmt. Area: The daily bag limit per person is a 10-fish combination. Exceptions include three Cabezon, four black rockfish and three Canary allowed per person as part of their 10-fish bag limit. Cabezon have a minimum 15-inch size limit and Kelp and/or rock greenlings must be 12-inches. The daily bag limit of Lingcod is two per person and they must be 22-inches in length. The take and possession of Cowcod, Bronzespotted rockfish, and Yelloweye rockfish will remain prohibited statewide. Petrale sole and Starry flounder can be retained year-round at all depths with no size limit. Current regulations in the Mendocino Mgmt. Area are identical to the Northern Mgmt. Area. For more information about recreational groundfish regulations, please call the hotline at 831-649-2801 or visit https://wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Regulations/Groundfish-Summary#north. You can also email AskMarine@wildlife.ca.gov, or call your nearest CDFW office for the latest information.

Important reminder:
When fishing for halibut, rockfish and salmon (Shelter Cove), or any combination of the three, the more restrictive gear and depth restrictions apply. When targeting salmon, or once salmon are aboard and in possession, anglers are limited to using barbless hooks (barbless circle hooks if fishing south of Horse Mountain) when fishing for other species.

When targeting rockfish, cabezon, greenling and lingcod, or once any of these species are aboard and in possession, anglers are limited to fishing in waters shallower than 180 feet when fishing for other species.

California halibut regulations
As a reminder, the recreational fishery for California halibut remains open year-round. The daily bag and possession limit is three fish north of Point Sur, Monterey County. The minimum size limit is 22 inches total length. Fishing for CA halibut inside Humboldt Bay should take off within the next few weeks as the freshwater starts to leave the bay. A few boats have been out this week, but I haven’t heard of many being caught as of yet.

Shelter Cove boat launch update
According to Jake Mitchell, Board President of the Shelter Cove Fishing Preservation Inc., the launch facility will be back open beginning Saturday, April 25. However, launching will be for Humboldt County residents only. Proof of residency for all passengers will be required in order to launch. Only people from the same household/family can be on a vessel together. Hours of operation will be 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the cost is $35. The public restrooms, campground and hotels remain closed. For more information, visit https://sheltercovefishingpreservationinc.org/ or https://www.facebook.com/scfpinc/. The boat launch office can be reached at 707–986-1400.

Brookings rockfish update
“Lingcod and rockfish are biting well out of Brookings, but fishing remains limited to Oregon residents because of ODFW’s decision to prohibit non-resident anglers while the governor’s stay-home order is in place,” said Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “Fishing is best from Bird Island to House Rock. Surfperch also are biting well at Brookings-area beaches.”

Increased flows coming down the Klamath
In a press release issued on Tuesday, the Bureau of Reclamation, in coordination with PacifiCorp, plans to increase flows below Iron Gate Dam to reduce the risk of disease for Coho salmon in the Klamath River.

Beginning April 22, flows below Iron Gate Dam will increase from approximately 1,325 cubic feet per second up to 6,000 cfs. Increased releases out of Upper Klamath Lake will occur simultaneously. The highest releases, of up to approximately 6,000 cfs, will continue for 72 hours. Flows will ramp back down to normal by May 1. The public is urged to take all necessary precautions on or near the Link and Klamath rivers while flows are high during this period. Reclamation is implementing the increased flow event as analyzed in the NMFS 2019 Biological Opinion and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2020 Biological Opinion. The flushing flow has been coordinated with other Klamath Project operations to minimize the potential negative impacts on Upper Klamath Lake elevations and the endangered Lost River and shortnose suckers. For additional information, contact the Klamath Basin Area Office at 541-883-6935.

The Rivers:
Main Stem Eel
The main stem Eel is running at 1,800 cfs on the Scotia gauge as of Wednesday. The river is in good shape, and there should be some steelhead around. The boat traffic has been light and the Stafford boat access gate remains locked.

Lower Rogue
Spring salmon fishing remains very slow on the lower Rogue River according to Martin. “Few springers appear to be moving upstream. A major rain is needed to draw salmon in from the ocean,” added Martin.

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

Humboldt’s recreational fisheries to remain open

Ten year-old Canyon Martin of Blue Lake landed a nice redtail perch last Sunday while fishing on one of the local beaches. Perch fishing has been excellent the last few weeks. Centerville, Table Bluff, and Samoa beaches are some of the top spots. Photo courtesy of Aaron Martin

Wednesday’s California Fish and Game Commission meeting came and went with no restrictions or closures to Humboldt County’s recreational fisheries. The meeting, which included a couple hours of public comment, was first and foremost held to grant the director of the CDFW the temporary authority to selectively restrict sport fishing in some regions of the state due to public health concerns related to COVID-19. The Commission voted unanimously, giving the ability to CDFW Director Charlton Bonham to postpone the spring trout season, which opens April 25, in a few eastern Sierra counties at the request of local officials.

“I understand Californians desperately need the outdoors for solace, reinvigoration and spirituality, especially so right now,” said CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham in a press release quickly issued by CDFW on Wednesday afternoon. “The proposal was never about a statewide permanent closure. It is about being responsive to local needs in this public health emergency, where we must do all we can as Californians to help each other make it through this together. We intend to use this authority surgically and based on local needs and knowledge.”

Elected officials in Mono, Inyo, and Alpine counties have been urging the governor’s administration to close the fishing season in their rivers and lakes. They fear that the onslaught of out-of-town anglers who normally travel to their regions to fish for trout will bring the coronavirus with them. The small, rural communities are also short on services, including places for anglers to stay and eat. Hospitals and medical facilities are also limited.

Rex Bohn, Humboldt County’s 1st District Supervisor was one of a handful of elected officials who publicly commented during the remote teleconference. Bohn was in full support of the three counties wanting to delay their fishing seasons. He also made it clear that control over the emergency fishing regulations should be at the county level. During the meeting, Bonham emphasized that his emergency authority, which expires at the end of May, would only be used to close fishing in the counties that request a closure.

Oregon closes fishing/hunting to non-residents
The Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife has closed recreational hunting, fishing, crabbing and clamming to non-residents due to concerns about travel to Oregon to participate in these outdoor activities according to a press release issued last Thursday. Such travel could spread the virus and put more of a burden on Oregon’s rural communities.

As of Friday, April 10, 11:59 p.m., non-residents may no longer participate in these activities in Oregon. The restriction extends until COVID-19 restrictions are lifted and it is deemed safe to travel into Oregon. This order does not apply to anyone living in Oregon for less than six months who has not yet established residency. 

ODFW anticipates there will be opportunity for non-residents who have already purchased a 2020 license to participate in hunting, fishing or shellfish opportunities later in the year. ODFW will refund non-resident spring bear and spring turkey tags and reinstate preference points for spring bear hunters. Please contact Licensing at odfw.websales@state.or.us, (503) 947-6101 to arrange for a refund. For more information, visit https://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2020/04_April/040920.asp

“Critically Dry” year designation for Trinity River
The official water year designation for the Trinity River in 2020 is “Critically Dry” as determined by the April 1st reservoir inflow forecast of 515,000 acre feet, which allows for releases to the river of 369,000 acre feet according to the Trinity River Restoration Program.

Photo courtesy of https://www.trrp.net/

The recommended flows will increase beginning April 14, and peak flows will reach 3,900 cfs on April 24 and ramp down to 750 cfs on June 13. Flows will peak again at 1,400 cfs on June 16, then decreases to the summer baseflow of 450 cfs on July 3. The Trinity Management Council (TMC) flow release hydrograph recommendation is awaiting approval by the U.S. Department of Interior. For more information, visit https://www.trrp.net/restoration/flows/current/

The Beach/Jetty’s
When the ocean has cooperated, the Redtail perch action has been excellent along the beaches. There are some spots that are typically better than others, but you can catch them just about anywhere this time of the year. Conditions look good for Saturday, with swells in the 3 to 4-foot range. Both the north and south jetty’s have been fishing well for the past few weeks. Five to six-inch Gulp jerk shads are a popular bait as well as smaller swimbaits. Egg sinkers or banana weights rigged with a herring are also catching rockfish and the occasional lingcod.

Brookings ocean update
Lingcod fishing slowed last week, mainly because of windy weather reports Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “Boats have remained at port. Calmer weather is in the forecast this weekend. Surfperch are biting near the north jetty. Fishing is closed to non-resident anglers,” added Martin.

The Rivers:

As a reminder, the South Fork Eel, Van Duzen, Mattole, Mad, Redwood Creek, and the Chetco all closed to fishing on March 31.

Lower Rogue
The Rogue is low and clear, resulting in very slow fishing for spring king salmon according to Martin. He said, “A few springers are trickling through, but catch rates are poor for boaters and plunkers from shore. No major rain is in the forecast.”

Smith
The Smith was right around 1,650 cfs on the Jed Smith gauge on Wednesday. Fishing reports have been hard to come by as fishing access is extremely limited. The three access points that remain open to non-commercial boats are the U.S. Forest Service launch at the Forks, Ruby Van Deventer County Park and the Del Norte County boat ramp (Outiffers).

Main Stem Eel
As of Wednesday, the main Eel was running at 2,500 cfs on the Scotia gauge. The river is in perfect shape and there are quite a few steelhead making their way downriver. Fishing pressure has been light. The main stem Eel to the South Fork is open all year. From the mouth to Fulmor Rd. Only artificial lures with barbless hooks may be used from April 1 through the Friday preceding the fourth Saturday in May. From Fulmor Rd. to the South Fork, only artificial lures with barbless hooks may be used from Apr. 1 through Sept. 30.

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

Decent season ahead for ocean salmon anglers

North Coast ocean sport salmon anglers are looking at a potential two-month season this summer, which should provide plenty of opportunity to land a salmon like the one pictured here with Grass Valley resident Larry Elis. The season is tentatively slated to begin on June 6 and run through Aug. 9 in the CA-KMZ. Photo courtesy of Curt Wilson/Wind Rose Charters

Expecting the worst and hoping for the best, North Coast ocean sport salmon fishermen received some good news this week. Following last year’s low Klamath returns and with only 186,600 adult kings said to be in the ocean this fall, heavy restrictions were likely eminent. But that wasn’t quite the case as the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) came up with a modest 64-day season for the CA KMZ. (OR/CA border south to Horse Mtn) Our season in Alternative 1 that was developed back in March was from June 6 through July 31. As luck would have it, the April closures in the San Francisco and Monterey management zones saved some Klamath fall Chinook impacts, which in turn extended our season by eight days. The CA KMZ season submitted for the current preferred alternative is June 6 to August 9, which in all likelihood will be adopted. Fishing will be allowed seven days per week for all salmon except Coho, two fish per day and a minimum size limit of 20 inches total length for Chinook.

With a robust 473,200 Sacramento fall Chinook said to be swimming in the ocean, the seasons to our south will have a much longer season, even after all of the April openers were delayed. The area from Horse Mountain south to Point Arena, which includes Shelter Cove and Fort Bragg, will open on May 1 and run through November 8. The San Francisco area will have the same season opening and closing dates. Fishing will be allowed seven days per week for all salmon except Coho, two fish per day and a minimum size limit of 20 total length for Chinook.

To the north in the Brookings area (OR KMZ), the season will open on June 20 and run through August 7. Fishing will be allowed seven days per week for all salmon except Coho, two fish per day and a minimum size limit of 24 inches total length for Chinook.

From Cape Falcon to Humbug Mtn., a mark-selective Coho fishery will run from June 27 through the earlier of Aug. 16, or 22,0000 marked Coho quota. Fishing is allowed seven days per week. All Coho must be fin clipped and a minimum of 16 inches. From Cape Falcon to the Humbug Mtn., a non-mark-selective Coho fishery will run Sept. 4-5, and open each Friday and Saturday through the earlier of September 30, or 3,000 non-mark-selective Coho quota. Coho must be a minimum of 16 inches.

For more info on the salmon season, visit https://www.pcouncil.org/april-2020-briefing-book-2/

Klamath/Trinity quota river update
Along with ocean salmon seasons up for final approval, the PFMC allocated 1,296 adult Chinook for the Klamath Basin quota. Bag and possession limits will be determined at the CA Fish and Game Commission meeting on April 15 and 16. The tribal allocation is 8,632 adult Klamath River fall salmon, split between the Yurok and Hoopa tribes.

Potential sportfishing ban – Commission to hold emergency meeting Thursday
The California Fish and Game Commission is asking the public to join an emergency teleconference call on Thursday, April 9 at 8:30 a.m. to discuss handing over temporary authority to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) to delay, suspend or restrict sport or recreational fishing in specific areas within the state due to public health concerns related to COVID-19. If authority is granted, CDFW would be able to make statewide decisions up until June 1, when the authority expires. If the director of CDFW finds that delaying fishing seasons, such as the Eastern Sierra trout opener, April 25, is necessary to protect against the threat from COVID-19, then the 2020 fishing season could face several restrictions based on state, federal, local, and tribal public health guidance and public safety needs.

The opportunity to cast your input is available by calling the Commission or joining in the meeting via teleconference and webinar. The phone number is (877) 402-9753 or (636) 651-3141; access code 832 4310. Anyone can attend the meeting through CDFW’s live webinar at https://cawildlife.webex.com/cawildlife/j.php?MTID=m6435b7aec2cf1a5f67dd5f4cd6f4a18

Brookings ocean update
Lingcod fishing has been especially good out of Brookings according to Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “Boaters are getting into lings to the north and south of the harbor,” said Martin. “Fishing also is very good for rockfish. A few lingcod caught been caught from the north jetty and near Chetco Point from the rocks. Surf perch are biting near the Chetco River jetties. Several normal hot spots, including Crissy Field, Winchuck Wayside, McVay Rock and alone Ranch, are closed because of state park closures in Oregon.”

Eel River steelhead returns
As of April 5, a total of 237 steelhead have entered the Van Arsdale fish count station according to Scott L Harris, an associate Biologist with the Northern Region. Making up that total is 85 males, 115 females, and 37 unknowns. The Chinook count stands at 153 and is done for the season. For more information, visit https://eelriver.org/the-eel-river/fish-count/

The Rivers
Smith
The Smith remains in good shape, running at just above 8-feet on the Jed Smith gauge as of Wednesday. According to guide Mike Coopman, last weeks rise brought in some fresh fish. “A few fresh steelhead showed up last week, and we saw a few downers as well,” said Coopman. “I’ve heard there’s quite a few fish spawning in the upper reaches now, those are probably fish that just came in. I’d expect to see a lot more spawned out fish making their way down in the next few weeks.” As a reminder, all of the State Park entrances are closed and blocked off. The three access points that remain open to non-commercial boats are the U.S. Forest Service launch at the Forks, Ruby Van Deventer County Park and the Del Norte County boat ramp (Outiffers).

Main Stem Eel
As of Wednesday, the main Eel was running at 5,200 cfs on the Scotia gauge and starting to turn a little green. It could fish by the weekend, and will be in prime shape by early next week. Should be plenty of downers as well as fresh steelhead in the mix.

Lower Rogue
According to Martin, a few spring salmon were caught early last week on the lower Rogue, but fishing has since slowed, with low, clear water and not a lot of fish around. “Dry weather is expected for several days, which may keep fishing tough. Late April and early May are prime time for lower Rogue springers.”

Find “Fishing the North Coast” on Facebook and fishingthenorthcoast.com for up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information. Questions, comments and photos can be emailed to kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com